Three Places Good Businesses Come From
By: ALAN FULLERTON

At Mirus, we work with middle-market companies, typically closely-held and often “organically grown” with the founder(s) still involved. Most of our clients have built their business around particular cultures (customer-oriented, cost-driven, innovation-centered, team-oriented, etc.), strategy (focus, cost, etc.) as well as particular capabilities, often developed following early success with one or more significant customers.  Sometimes those capabilities are developed out of adversity.

Here are three (of many) places I’ve seen good companies come from.  The paths they took varied, but the businesses behind these strategies all had successful M&A or growth capital transactions.
 

A 10-Year Review and Analysis of Med-Tech Funding Trends
By: PATRICK WEST

Where Institution Money Is Going, Where It Is Not…And Options for the Not Category

There is a growing concern about funding options for early stage therapeutic devices…a sentiment that I witness firsthand every week as an angel investor and banker. The feeling is that device companies are outcasts when it came to securing the funding needed to move their technology forward – particularly from the institutional investment community. Although biotech, healthcare technology (IT) and cell therapy currently appear as attractive as ever, therapeutic device companies are viewed as undesirable or less attractive opportunities.The following report explores a 10-year review of Med-Tech funding trends.


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4 Ways to Maintain Confidentiality When Selling A Business
By: ANDY CRAIN

Many business owners we work with when selling a company express deep concerns about maintaining the confidentiality of the M&A process:  “If my competitors learn that my business is for sale, they’ll tell their sales force and all my customers will know.”

This is a concern with which I’m painfully familiar. When selling my family’s fifth-generation manufacturing business a decade ago, I first learned the sale was no longer a secret when a reporter called me on December 24th seeking my comments for a story they planned to print on Christmas Day.   Ouch!

 

Why Take a PAAS?
By:
BRUCE BOES

Over recent years we have seen a preference of PLM and ERP suppliers to work with a few large System Integrators to implement their products within large customers who demand special attention and substantial resources, often in spikes of demand.

Now, with the demand of manufacturing companies for industry specific solutions, proliferation of the cloud, and the attractiveness of Software as a Service pricing models, Mirus in turn sees the Platform as a Service (PaaS) model as the next tidal wave in product delivery for System Integrators. Delivery of a preferred solution, customized and maintained to customer requirements and paid for monthly, without huge capital outlays; at prices lower than pure custom-built solutions, is an attractive customer value proposition.


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In this Issue:
Three Places Good Businesses Come From

A 10-Year Review and Analysis of Med-Tech Funding Trends

4 Ways to Maintain Confidentiality When Selling a Business

Why Take a PAAS?


Selling a Business: Partnering with an Exit in Mind